Help name Alameda’s new streets

Alameda Friends! I need your quick (and easy) help! The streets of Alameda Landing are about to be named, and I think we’re missing a great chance to better represent the rich, diverse history of Alameda that is not well reflected in the names of our streets. Now is a great time to start changing that. With this in mind, I’m compiling a list of names of people of consequence from Alameda’s history (preferably deceased to avoid issues of politics, etc.) to propose in just over a week. I’d really like to make a solid effort to include names from communities not typically reflected in our street names. Can you help provide suitable names? (A 1-2 sentence summary of why they would be good would be helpful too.) I’ll track the suggestions at the end of this post, leave suggestions in the comments and I’ll update once a day. There are going to be a lot of new street names in the coming years, so lets generate a great list for more than just these streets, but for Alameda Point as well. Once we have the list, we’ll take them to the city to work on adopting them for approved use. If you’re interested in participating, share this post with your Alameda friends and thanks! Updated: Here’s the current City approved list

The List (updated 4/23 @ 12:30 pm):

    • Barbara Manning. Barbara was the first African American administrator in AUSD and she had to fight against some pretty blatant racism to earn the position. She was a remarkable educator who could lead a school because she was actually a phenomenal classroom teacher. She was bold and strong.
    • Frank Weedon was instrumental in getting the Alameda Pools established and making sure all Alameda kids had the opportunity to learn to swim. The kinderswim program which is free to all is still going strong!
    • Don Grant. He was a teacher and track coach at Encinal High…and he was African American
    • Mr. David Peterson. Loved by thousands of families. Not long before he passed, he received two proclamations
    • Frank Epperson — inventor of the popsicle (then 11 years old)
    • Strehlow (family) – developers of neptune beach
    • Louis A. McCall, Sr. — Co-founder of the band Con Funk Shun.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_A._McCall,_Sr.
    • Other famous residents of Alameda: Phyllis Diller, Jim Morrison
    •  the Spite House…
    • Al DeWitt —
    • Beverly street for Bev Johnson in recognition of her leadership as mayor.
    • Hughes street and Spruce Goose Lane (didn’t the SG fly out of Alameda?) 
    • We have a 6th street and 8th street but no 7th street. Why not 7th street?
    • Chelsea Manning Boulevard
    • What about something in homage to the natives who lived here before we carted away their shellmounds to use for paving Bay Farm? Like Ohlone or Costanoan streets, for example.
    • Southern Pacific and Central Pacific railroads built the two lines which had trestles on the north shore at west end, into the bay to meet the ferries. Did those lines themselves have names, like the Red Line? For example, a street near Encinal Terminals might be Alaska Packer Way. Is there a Leonard Street even in Leonardville ? It would be nice to mix it up with a section of old historic references like Leonard, some with basic natural references like Ohlone and another with civic leaders such as teachers and civil rights advocates.
    • How do you think Guyton Way or Hendersen Lane would go over with the masses?
    • Harold Gonsalves, The only Medal of Honor recipient from Alameda that died in combat.
    • George Miller should be considered.(congressman from here for 26 years. He was chairman of the committee for science and astronautics during the glory days of the space program.)
    • it would be great to name a street after the late and sorely missed Alameda dance teacher, Bryant Cash-Welch
    • Frank Bette Street
    • Bud Gunderson Drive!
    • Terry LaCroix
    • living legend named Nick Cabral. For what he does and has done for the City of Alameda and the people who live there
    •  the late Bob Enos, who was one of our island’s musical treasures.http://www.yelp.com/biz/roosters-alameda-alameda.
    • Jack Capon who was so instrumental in education and Special Olympics on the island.
    • Jean Hillery, Alamedan and USDA inspector
    • John N. Aschow, Violin Maker. Born in Denmark in 1885, studied at the Mittenwald Violin Making School (http://www.instrument-making-school.eu/) he migrated to the California around 1906 and worked for Kohler and Chase (possibly at 1013 Broadway, Alameda). Opened his own shop at 1242 Park St, Alameda (~ 1910). Later had a shop in Oakland at 2311 Grove St, Oakland. Co-founder of the Scandinavian Club of Alameda in 1924.
    • Berresford Bingham retired from the navy here.  First African American elected to school board.
    • Marie Gilmore’s father in law (husbands father)  was a civil rights pioneer in alameda. Led sit in at franklin park  before fair housing laws and African American population decimated
    • Lois Hanna served on the school board and is responsible for keeping the dream of a library alive.  She worked hard to get Earhart school named for a woman
    • Nellie Takeda — passed away in 2012 at the age of 97-was a leader and icon in our community at Buena Vista UMC but also beloved by many in the community at large
    • Elector Littlejohn –  matriarch of the Littlejohn family –civil rights activist & leader of African American community in Alameda—Buena Vista park was renamed in her memory
    • F. M. “Borax” Smith:Smith commissioned America’s first Reinforced Concrete building, the Pacific Coast Borax Company refinery, in Alameda, California in 1893. The architect was Ernest L. Ransome

    • Huchiun, which were the people who lived here for thousands of years
    • the names of any of the last Ohlone to live on Alameda
    • Lil Arnerich

    • Anne Taylor. Perhaps a street could be named in her honor
    • Jim James Pellettieri
    • Popsicle, SnoCone and Peanut Butter
    • First names only would be fun.
    • We could have a street named in honor of all Alameda mayors. Call it Mayors Avenue
    • Alaska Packers had Cool names for their ships. Native Americans should be honored. The heck with Starlight etc.
    • Wouldn’t it be better to name the streets as a nod to the associated buildings and functions of its historic days before being turned into Genericville? Seaplane, Hangar, Bachelor Quarters, China Clipper, Control Tower, Transcontinental Railroad, Least Tern Parking Lot….
    • Maybe some famous people from the arts, medicine or scholars instead of the usual politicians and war heros?
    • animals and plants that would have been here historically? Tule Elk Drive, Bullrush Place, Banana Slug terrace